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Meet Phillis Stacy-Brooks of Main Street Graphics

Today we’d like to introduce you to Phillis Stacy-Brooks.

Hi Phillis, so excited to have you on the platform. So before we get into questions about your work-life, maybe you can bring our readers up to speed on your story and how you got to where you are today?
I was working long hours for a well-known automotive manufacturer when I found that I was going to be a single mom of twin two-year-old boys. I knew I had to make a change because I wanted to always be part of their lives. But I loved what I did, I’d wake up every morning looking forward to working. I had to find a happy medium and that was starting my own business. Here’s what my day looked like; I’d wake up around 3:30 in the am and start working until 6:30 then I’d get the boys ready for daycare. Once they were in daycare, I’d have about 5 hours of uninterrupted work. Then I’d picked them up and it would be our family time. My clients were serviced and happy and so was I. It worked. This schedule lasted until they graduated from High School and funny enough, I still keep that schedule. Once again, you have to adapt to what works for you and your clients. Designing has always given me great pleasure. I’m very blessed to have been able to do the two things I love the most, raise my boys and design. Main Street is primarily now a branding and marketing studio. This is what I do best. I hope I’ll being designing for clients for a very long time!

We all face challenges, but looking back would you describe it as a relatively smooth road?
Starting out as Creative Director for an automotive manufacture was a help. I had a strong background and years of experience. But that didn’t mean clients were busting down my door. It took about three years before I felt comfortable with my client base. It helped that I love working with nonprofits and volunteered as much as possible to be seen in the community.

Thanks – so what else should our readers know about Main Street Graphics?
Phillis Stacy-Brooks is a national award-winning Creative Director with an extensive background in company and product brand development and social media marketing. Founder of Main Street Graphics, Our Social Bar, and Music 4 Purpose, a concert event held for nonprofits. She has been a graphic designer for 16 years and the author of the “What Makes Books” series.

Phillis has had the great fortune to work with some biggest companies such as Walt Disney Studios, Healthnet, Lexus, a Division of Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc., Oakland Athletics, John Paul Mitchell Systems, San Francisco Bay Blackhawks, Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc., University of California-Los Angeles, Honda Financial Services, Toyota Financial Services, Universal Studios, Warner Bros., Hilton Hotels, New Line Cinema, Oscar Home Care, Manhattan Short Film Festival, Wendy’s International, LLC, SCVi Charter School.

Her passion for the non-profit arena has led her to work with: The Los Angeles Women’s Theatre Festival, Single Mothers Outreach, Circle of Hope, SCV Charity Chili Cook-Off, Hardship 2 Hope, Spotlight Art Center, SRD Straightening Reins, and Mothers Fighting For Others.

She loves to cook and craft. She is the busy and proud mother of three boys.

Are there any important lessons you’ve learned that you can share with us?
Never give up. For example, before 2007 I was charging over $2000 for a logo. When everything went bad in 2007-2008 to get anyone to work with me, my logo prices dropped to $295. I have to adjust my way of thinking and doing business. And no, I did not sacrifice the quality of my work. I still offered the service I always did. Thankfully I survived and once again have a thriving business. You must adapt to the times.

Contact Info:

Image Credits
Main Street Graphics

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